File under ‘fabulous resources that I doubt I’ll ever get time to read properly’: the Journal of Universal Computer Science, D-Lib Magazine (‘digital library research and development, including but not limited to new technologies, applications, and contextual social and economic issues’) and transcripts from the Research Library in the 21st Century symposium.

On the other hand, Introduction to Abject-Oriented Programming is a very quick read, and laugh-out-loud funny (if you’re a tragic geek like me).

I came across a mention of ‘Digital Object Identifiers’ in a paper on digital humanities, and discovered DOI.org:

A DOI name – a digital identifier for any object of intellectual property. A DOI name provides a means of persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related current data in a structured extensible way.

A DOI name can apply to any form of intellectual property expressed in any digital environment. DOI names have been called “the bar code for intellectual property”: like the physical bar code, they are enabling tools for use all through the supply chain to add value and save cost.

A DOI name differs from commonly used internet pointers to material such as the URL because it identifies an object as a first-class entity, not simply the place where the object is located. The DOI name identifies an entity directly, not some attribute of an object (an address is an attribute of a thing, whereas the thing itself is a first class object).

At some stage I have a big post to write about stable, permanent URIs for museum objects, and I’ll be re-visiting this site when I start that.